painting of the pear tree at Stoke Ash

Pear Tree

circa 1950s, oil on board

The leaning pear tree grew close to the cottage  in Stoke Ash, Suffolk in which Jean Royle lived and in this painting it stands amid a dense mass of summer foliage depicted in soft muted greens. Bright sunlight creates dappled shade and contributes to the imprssionistic feel of this painting.  A variety of yellowish greens echo the lighter tones of the foliage in the broken ground vegetation, where a  group of hens are gathered near the tree trunk painted in rich warm browns.  The tree’s foliage is darker than that of another tree in very full leaf on the left of it, and that of a more distant sapling to the right.  As in  Monet’s painting ‘AppleTrees on the Chantemesle Hill’, (see thumbnail below) the  tree is both the focus of the painting as well as being part of a wider whole into which it is integrated.

 Jean Royle was a landscape artist who always lived in the shadow of her father’s ability and achievements. He ensured she had a training in the arts believing she had the potential to become, like him, a landscape artist. She fulfilled this but did not receive the recognition for her abilities in her life time.

 

apple_trees_chantemesle_hill_monet_1

Claude Monet